29 results for National-Conservation-Commission in Grenada
 
 

• The water sector was under direct supervision of the Government of Grenada as a department of Public Works and operated from Tanteen, St. George's.
• In 1971 the busi ness of water was separated from Public Works, relocated to the vicinity of Queen's Park (now National Stadium) and was called Water Works.
• In the late 1970s Water Works was relocated to the Carenage and was called the Central Water Commission (CWC).
• In 1990 there was a name change to National Water and Sewerage Authority (NAWASA) by an Act of Parliament in 1990.

Operations

• In rural and sub-urban communities water was supplied by slow sand filter systems and the parish of St. George's was supplied by Observatory and Richmond Hill reservoirs.
• The Observatory reservoir was constructed as a result of combating an outbreak of Typhoid during the early 1950s.
• The development of tourism in the early 1970s necessitated increase in water supply, which resulted in the establishment of borehole programs on the island to augment the two storage systems above.
• The first major construction of borehole pump water system is the Woodland's 1 and 2, which yielded 100,000 gallons per day.
• There was another borehole pump construction at the Chemin Valley, Calivigny. These pumping systems supplied water to the Woburn tank for distribution to the South of the island.
• Added to the above systems, Annandale Dam and Water Treatment Plant were constructed in 1972 and commissioned in 1975 to meet the demands of the South of the island.

Carriacou & Petit Martinique

• In the early 1950s the English built two (2) wind mills in Hillsborough to pump water to several storage water catchment cisterns.
• There was a main cistern at Top Hill where villagers would catch their water.
• Over time the wind mills were destroyed by natural disasters and electrical pumps were installed.
• The water supply is now pumped through one (1) borehole at Beausejour to serve Gu est Houses, Hotels, utilities and some residents.

Sewerage

• Public sewer system was concentrated in the town of St. George and, it was the responsibility of Government to dispose of sewer. CWC was responsible to do repair works.
• Today NAWASA is now responsible for construction and maintenance of the public sewer system. Sewer systems remains concentrated in the town of St. George and in the south of the island.
• The responsibility for Sewerage commenced in the latter part of 1930s and commissioned in early 1940s.

Technology

• Vehicles were used to carry men to work sites.
• The pick axe was a main tool used to cut trenches for pipe laying until early 1990s.
• There was a transition of cash registers to computers in the early 1990s.

Administration

• Telephone was always available.
• Payment of bills was done on a fortnightly basis and, it was calculated based on the rental value of one's property.
• District Revenue offices collected water rates for CWC.
Read more......Read less

 
 

St. Louis Service has over 50 years experience in the Business Industry in Grenada and we are delighted to pass on the benefits to our clients. In the field of customs brokera ge, we pride ourselves by taking away the worries of customs formalities from our clients when importing and exporting goods. Our intimate knowledge of the Countrys Customs Laws coupled with our association with Freight Forwarders throughout the world go hand in hand to provide a truly dedicated service to our clients.

We provide a comprehensive service to almost all parts on the globe. To accomplish this, we have an excellent international network with several ocean and air freight forwarders throughout the world.

For persons moving to Grenada from overseas, and wish to ship household and or personal effects, we provide a door-to-door service with guaranteed reliability. Moving from Grenada? Our packers will treat your valuables with the greatest care. We are dedicated to make our clients relocation a smooth and stress free experience.

In order to avoid unpleasant surprises, hassle and disappointments, Returning Nationals and Entrepreneurs are strongly urged to contact us for FREE advice when planning to move, in order to obtain necessary pertinent information, relevant to Customs formalities and Concessions, etc. granted by the Grenada Government to such persons. To begin, we can make the Clearance of your Belongings through the Grenada Customs and Port-Hassle Free!
Read more......Read less

 
 

Sol is a leading Caribbean employer offering rewarding, long-term careers for its people with a focus on the development of regional talent and expertise. It is our people who will drive growth in our businesses in the future and we intend to ensure that they form the centre of everything that we do. We have already initiated a major Caribbean recruitment campaign - the start of a concerted effort to invest in existing, and new, talent with a focus on regional expertise. Sol is an equal opportunity employer and aims to create a world-class operation through the development and retention of talented Caribbean nationals across the region. With a results oriented focus and a "pay for performance" compensation and reward philosophy, Sol will provide challenging and meaningful careers to the right people. Read more......Read less

 
 

D2O Scuba is Grenada's premier PADI 5 Star Gold Palm Instructor Dive Resort. At the D2O Scuba Diving and Water Sports Centre, we lead in the wonders of water. We are a custome r-focused facility that opens new opportunities to divers, students, and enthusiasts to promote a diversity of water based experiences for visitors to Grenada. D2O is conveniently located on the pristine beach at the Grenadian by Rex resorts. We offer the largest selection of diving and water sports activities to be found in Grenada. Our stunning reefs are home to countless species of fish, corals, and other aquatic life. We have twelve wrecks for you to explore, including the Titanic of the Caribbean, the Bianca C ! With an immediate proximity to both Atlantic and Caribbean waters, our dive sites are only minutes away. Whether you prefer wrecks or reefs, fast-flowing currents or easy drifts, our flexible diving schedule will accommodate your needs. At D2O, we cater to all divers and we have complimentary house b lend Nitrox available. Our knowledgeable PADI professionals are ready to guide you in personalized groups based on your comfort level. At D2O water is our way of life, and we look forward to introducing you to what our waters can offer! Read more......Read less

 
 

The Grenada Airports Authority (The Authority) is a statutory organization established on October 1985 by the Government of. The Airports Authority of Grenada is a corporate b ody with power to manage, control and supervise airports and to promote the use of such airports in the national interest. At present the Airports Authority of Grenada is responsible for the management of three airports in Grenada, namely Lauriston, Pearls Airport and Maurice Bishop International Airport. Read more......Read less

 
 

• The water sector was under direct supervision of the Government of Grenada as a department of Public Works and operated from Tanteen, St. George's.
• In 1971 the busi ness of water was separated from Public Works, relocated to the vicinity of Queen's Park (now National Stadium) and was called Water Works.
• In the late 1970s Water Works was relocated to the Carenage and was called the Central Water Commission (CWC).
• In 1990 there was a name change to National Water and Sewerage Authority (NAWASA) by an Act of Parliament in 1990.

Operations

• In rural and sub-urban communities water was supplied by slow sand filter systems and the parish of St. George's was supplied by Observatory and Richmond Hill reservoirs.
• The Observatory reservoir was constructed as a result of combating an outbreak of Typhoid during the early 1950s.
• The development of tourism in the early 1970s necessitated increase in water supply, which resulted in the establishment of borehole programs on the island to augment the two storage systems above.
• The first major construction of borehole pump water system is the Woodland's 1 and 2, which yielded 100,000 gallons per day.
• There was another borehole pump construction at the Chemin Valley, Calivigny. These pumping systems supplied water to the Woburn tank for distribution to the South of the island.
• Added to the above systems, Annandale Dam and Water Treatment Plant were constructed in 1972 and commissioned in 1975 to meet the demands of the South of the island.

Carriacou & Petit Martinique

• In the early 1950s the English built two (2) wind mills in Hillsborough to pump water to several storage water catchment cisterns.
• There was a main cistern at Top Hill where villagers would catch their water.
• Over time the wind mills were destroyed by natural disasters and electrical pumps were installed.
• The water supply is now pumped through one (1) borehole at Beausejour to serve Gu est Houses, Hotels, utilities and some residents.

Sewerage

• Public sewer system was concentrated in the town of St. George and, it was the responsibility of Government to dispose of sewer. CWC was responsible to do repair works.
• Today NAWASA is now responsible for construction and maintenance of the public sewer system. Sewer systems remains concentrated in the town of St. George and in the south of the island.
• The responsibility for Sewerage commenced in the latter part of 1930s and commissioned in early 1940s.

Technology

• Vehicles were used to carry men to work sites.
• The pick axe was a main tool used to cut trenches for pipe laying until early 1990s.
• There was a transition of cash registers to computers in the early 1990s.

Administration

• Telephone was always available.
• Payment of bills was done on a fortnightly basis and, it was calculated based on the rental value of one's property.
• District Revenue offices collected water rates for CWC.
Read more......Read less

 
 

• The water sector was under direct supervision of the Government of Grenada as a department of Public Works and operated from Tanteen, St. George's.
• In 1971 the busi ness of water was separated from Public Works, relocated to the vicinity of Queen's Park (now National Stadium) and was called Water Works.
• In the late 1970s Water Works was relocated to the Carenage and was called the Central Water Commission (CWC).
• In 1990 there was a name change to National Water and Sewerage Authority (NAWASA) by an Act of Parliament in 1990.

Operations

• In rural and sub-urban communities water was supplied by slow sand filter systems and the parish of St. George's was supplied by Observatory and Richmond Hill reservoirs.
• The Observatory reservoir was constructed as a result of combating an outbreak of Typhoid during the early 1950s.
• The development of tourism in the early 1970s necessitated increase in water supply, which resulted in the establishment of borehole programs on the island to augment the two storage systems above.
• The first major construction of borehole pump water system is the Woodland's 1 and 2, which yielded 100,000 gallons per day.
• There was another borehole pump construction at the Chemin Valley, Calivigny. These pumping systems supplied water to the Woburn tank for distribution to the South of the island.
• Added to the above systems, Annandale Dam and Water Treatment Plant were constructed in 1972 and commissioned in 1975 to meet the demands of the South of the island.

Carriacou & Petit Martinique

• In the early 1950s the English built two (2) wind mills in Hillsborough to pump water to several storage water catchment cisterns.
• There was a main cistern at Top Hill where villagers would catch their water.
• Over time the wind mills were destroyed by natural disasters and electrical pumps were installed.
• The water supply is now pumped through one (1) borehole at Beausejour to serve Gu est Houses, Hotels, utilities and some residents.

Sewerage

• Public sewer system was concentrated in the town of St. George and, it was the responsibility of Government to dispose of sewer. CWC was responsible to do repair works.
• Today NAWASA is now responsible for construction and maintenance of the public sewer system. Sewer systems remains concentrated in the town of St. George and in the south of the island.
• The responsibility for Sewerage commenced in the latter part of 1930s and commissioned in early 1940s.

Technology

• Vehicles were used to carry men to work sites.
• The pick axe was a main tool used to cut trenches for pipe laying until early 1990s.
• There was a transition of cash registers to computers in the early 1990s.

Administration

• Telephone was always available.
• Payment of bills was done on a fortnightly basis and, it was calculated based on the rental value of one's property.
• District Revenue offices collected water rates for CWC.
Read more......Read less

 
 

• The water sector was under direct supervision of the Government of Grenada as a department of Public Works and operated from Tanteen, St. George's.
• In 1971 the busi ness of water was separated from Public Works, relocated to the vicinity of Queen's Park (now National Stadium) and was called Water Works.
• In the late 1970s Water Works was relocated to the Carenage and was called the Central Water Commission (CWC).
• In 1990 there was a name change to National Water and Sewerage Authority (NAWASA) by an Act of Parliament in 1990.

Operations

• In rural and sub-urban communities water was supplied by slow sand filter systems and the parish of St. George's was supplied by Observatory and Richmond Hill reservoirs.
• The Observatory reservoir was constructed as a result of combating an outbreak of Typhoid during the early 1950s.
• The development of tourism in the early 1970s necessitated increase in water supply, which resulted in the establishment of borehole programs on the island to augment the two storage systems above.
• The first major construction of borehole pump water system is the Woodland's 1 and 2, which yielded 100,000 gallons per day.
• There was another borehole pump construction at the Chemin Valley, Calivigny. These pumping systems supplied water to the Woburn tank for distribution to the South of the island.
• Added to the above systems, Annandale Dam and Water Treatment Plant were constructed in 1972 and commissioned in 1975 to meet the demands of the South of the island.

Carriacou & Petit Martinique

• In the early 1950s the English built two (2) wind mills in Hillsborough to pump water to several storage water catchment cisterns.
• There was a main cistern at Top Hill where villagers would catch their water.
• Over time the wind mills were destroyed by natural disasters and electrical pumps were installed.
• The water supply is now pumped through one (1) borehole at Beausejour to serve Gu est Houses, Hotels, utilities and some residents.

Sewerage

• Public sewer system was concentrated in the town of St. George and, it was the responsibility of Government to dispose of sewer. CWC was responsible to do repair works.
• Today NAWASA is now responsible for construction and maintenance of the public sewer system. Sewer systems remains concentrated in the town of St. George and in the south of the island.
• The responsibility for Sewerage commenced in the latter part of 1930s and commissioned in early 1940s.

Technology

• Vehicles were used to carry men to work sites.
• The pick axe was a main tool used to cut trenches for pipe laying until early 1990s.
• There was a transition of cash registers to computers in the early 1990s.

Administration

• Telephone was always available.
• Payment of bills was done on a fortnightly basis and, it was calculated based on the rental value of one's property.
• District Revenue offices collected water rates for CWC.
Read more......Read less

 
 

• The water sector was under direct supervision of the Government of Grenada as a department of Public Works and operated from Tanteen, St. George's.
• In 1971 the busi ness of water was separated from Public Works, relocated to the vicinity of Queen's Park (now National Stadium) and was called Water Works.
• In the late 1970s Water Works was relocated to the Carenage and was called the Central Water Commission (CWC).
• In 1990 there was a name change to National Water and Sewerage Authority (NAWASA) by an Act of Parliament in 1990.

Operations

• In rural and sub-urban communities water was supplied by slow sand filter systems and the parish of St. George's was supplied by Observatory and Richmond Hill reservoirs.
• The Observatory reservoir was constructed as a result of combating an outbreak of Typhoid during the early 1950s.
• The development of tourism in the early 1970s necessitated increase in water supply, which resulted in the establishment of borehole programs on the island to augment the two storage systems above.
• The first major construction of borehole pump water system is the Woodland's 1 and 2, which yielded 100,000 gallons per day.
• There was another borehole pump construction at the Chemin Valley, Calivigny. These pumping systems supplied water to the Woburn tank for distribution to the South of the island.
• Added to the above systems, Annandale Dam and Water Treatment Plant were constructed in 1972 and commissioned in 1975 to meet the demands of the South of the island.

Carriacou & Petit Martinique

• In the early 1950s the English built two (2) wind mills in Hillsborough to pump water to several storage water catchment cisterns.
• There was a main cistern at Top Hill where villagers would catch their water.
• Over time the wind mills were destroyed by natural disasters and electrical pumps were installed.
• The water supply is now pumped through one (1) borehole at Beausejour to serve Gu est Houses, Hotels, utilities and some residents.

Sewerage

• Public sewer system was concentrated in the town of St. George and, it was the responsibility of Government to dispose of sewer. CWC was responsible to do repair works.
• Today NAWASA is now responsible for construction and maintenance of the public sewer system. Sewer systems remains concentrated in the town of St. George and in the south of the island.
• The responsibility for Sewerage commenced in the latter part of 1930s and commissioned in early 1940s.

Technology

• Vehicles were used to carry men to work sites.
• The pick axe was a main tool used to cut trenches for pipe laying until early 1990s.
• There was a transition of cash registers to computers in the early 1990s.

Administration

• Telephone was always available.
• Payment of bills was done on a fortnightly basis and, it was calculated based on the rental value of one's property.
• District Revenue offices collected water rates for CWC.
Read more......Read less

 
 

• The water sector was under direct supervision of the Government of Grenada as a department of Public Works and operated from Tanteen, St. George's.
• In 1971 the busi ness of water was separated from Public Works, relocated to the vicinity of Queen's Park (now National Stadium) and was called Water Works.
• In the late 1970s Water Works was relocated to the Carenage and was called the Central Water Commission (CWC).
• In 1990 there was a name change to National Water and Sewerage Authority (NAWASA) by an Act of Parliament in 1990.

Operations

• In rural and sub-urban communities water was supplied by slow sand filter systems and the parish of St. George's was supplied by Observatory and Richmond Hill reservoirs.
• The Observatory reservoir was constructed as a result of combating an outbreak of Typhoid during the early 1950s.
• The development of tourism in the early 1970s necessitated increase in water supply, which resulted in the establishment of borehole programs on the island to augment the two storage systems above.
• The first major construction of borehole pump water system is the Woodland's 1 and 2, which yielded 100,000 gallons per day.
• There was another borehole pump construction at the Chemin Valley, Calivigny. These pumping systems supplied water to the Woburn tank for distribution to the South of the island.
• Added to the above systems, Annandale Dam and Water Treatment Plant were constructed in 1972 and commissioned in 1975 to meet the demands of the South of the island.

Carriacou & Petit Martinique

• In the early 1950s the English built two (2) wind mills in Hillsborough to pump water to several storage water catchment cisterns.
• There was a main cistern at Top Hill where villagers would catch their water.
• Over time the wind mills were destroyed by natural disasters and electrical pumps were installed.
• The water supply is now pumped through one (1) borehole at Beausejour to serve Gu est Houses, Hotels, utilities and some residents.

Sewerage

• Public sewer system was concentrated in the town of St. George and, it was the responsibility of Government to dispose of sewer. CWC was responsible to do repair works.
• Today NAWASA is now responsible for construction and maintenance of the public sewer system. Sewer systems remains concentrated in the town of St. George and in the south of the island.
• The responsibility for Sewerage commenced in the latter part of 1930s and commissioned in early 1940s.

Technology

• Vehicles were used to carry men to work sites.
• The pick axe was a main tool used to cut trenches for pipe laying until early 1990s.
• There was a transition of cash registers to computers in the early 1990s.

Administration

• Telephone was always available.
• Payment of bills was done on a fortnightly basis and, it was calculated based on the rental value of one's property.
• District Revenue offices collected water rates for CWC.
Read more......Read less

 
 

Monitoring Of CCTV, Security Consultancy Service, Employee Screening, Private Investigation, Patrol Service; Guard Service 24/7 Protecting Your Business Is Our Business

 
 

Welcome to Maca Bana We invites you to experience the coupling of comfort, quality and eco luxury at Maca Bana, an unmatched retreat thoughtfully designed by hospitality conno isseurs.

Maca Bana is located on the South Western peak of the Spice isle of Grenada, which is the southern most of the Windward Islands in the Caribbean. Perched atop two acres of seafront hillside, our guests can enjoy spectacular views of Grenada's capital, St. George's, and the picturesque Magazine beach below. The resort grounds are comprised of lush tropical gardens with a central rock waterfall feature, with terrapin and koi fish ponds. There is also an infinity-edge swimming pool overlooking Magazine beach. The views that Maca Bana guests enjoy are some of the most breathtaking that Grenada has to offer.

The resort is comprised of 7 uniquely designed 1 or 2 bedroom villas. 2 one-bedroom villas sleeping up to 2 people and 5 two bedroom villas sleeping up to 4 people. Each villa has been artistically decorated to reflect the tropical fruit for which it is named
with a casual Caribbean style of luxury, you will immediately feel welcome and relaxed in your holiday home. All of the seven spacious villas are air-conditioned, beautifully appointed and fully equipped with every amenity imaginable, private hot tubs and powered by solar energy, and complimentary wifi.

A 7-minute walk from the Maurice Bishop International Airport, this elegant hillside resort overlooking Magazine Beach is 12 km from the Grenada National Museum.

The 7 solar-powered villas have up to 3 bedrooms, and come with free Wi-Fi, iPod docks and flat-screen TVs. They also include kitchens and living rooms, as well as hot tubs and covered outdoor dining areas.

There's an open-air sea-view restaurant, an organic garden and a beach. Other amenities include an infinity pool, massage services and private yoga classes.
Read more......Read less

 
 

For the past 35 years, we've been sharing our beautiful island and marine activities with guests from around the world. Being Grenada's largest tour operator with over 21 tour s, we guarantee that we have just the tour for you. Whether it's a 4-hour Whale Watching tour, a Full/Half Day Sailing excursion, or a Sunset Cruise aboard our catamaran, we know you take your recreation, and your fun, seriously. Our management and staff are 100% Grenadian! That means that when you book any of our tours, you can be sure that you're getting the real deal! Browse through our site to learn more about our exciting tours and how we can make your vacation an unforgettable experience. Read more......Read less

 
 

Drop in or call us today and receive individual and personalized, friendly service from any of our trained associates REMEMBER

No Job is too big or too small for us to handle. We protect your valuables at all times. We give back to the various communities through sponsorships and charitable donations. We can always be relied upon to respond quickly in times of personal or national disasters, through donations or use of our facilities for relief gathering and packing. Hurricane Ivan is one recent example, as well as the flood in Guyana. Read more......Read less

 
 

Drop in or call us today and receive individual and personalized, friendly service from any of our trained associates REMEMBER

No Job is too big or too small for us to handle. We protect your valuables at all times. We give back to the various communities through sponsorships and charitable donations. We can always be relied upon to respond quickly in times of personal or national disasters, through donations or use of our facilities for relief gathering and packing. Hurricane Ivan is one recent example, as well as the flood in Guyana. Read more......Read less

 
 

The Grenada Board of Tourism is a proud member of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, the Travel Media Association of Canada and the Association of National Tourist Office Rep resentatives. Read more......Read less

 
 

The Grenada Board of Tourism is a proud member of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, the Travel Media Association of Canada and the Association of National Tourist Office Rep resentatives. Read more......Read less

 
 

The Grenada Board of Tourism is a proud member of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, the Travel Media Association of Canada and the Association of National Tourist Office Rep resentatives. Read more......Read less

 
 

The Grenada Board of Tourism is a proud member of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, the Travel Media Association of Canada and the Association of National Tourist Office Rep resentatives. Read more......Read less

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